• Curt Mercadante

You don't have to be an artist, a poet, or a musician to be a creator

An old back injury flared up this week, and so I went to a local chiropractor here in Ellijay, GA to get an adjustment (and will be back a few times during our final week here).


He's probably the fourth or fifth chiropractor I've seen in my life, and it's always fascinating to learn the different styles of different doctors.


But all of them are truly creative individuals.


They spend actual time asking questions about symptoms, pain, and background (a welcome change from the 11 second interruption time period of the average physician).


They also then spend time using their hands to examine your spine, feeling around for inflammation and other areas in which you might be out of alignment.


Then they create adjustments, treatments and regimens to help you get back to good health.


Rather than the quick, in-and-out, prescription mill that has come to define many appointments with M.D.'s, chiropractors are like detectives, seeking to find the cause of the problem so they can create solutions to fix it.


The reason I bring this up is that you might not think of a chiropractor as a creator.


But the term "creator" isn't just limited to an artist, or a poet, a musician, or a writer.


In fact, believe it or not, you are a creator.

We are all creators.


Hell, the simple fact of being a human means we are creating every second of the day.


If you're a parent, you create joy and love for your kids.


You create value for your employer.


You use your ideas to create impact for your clients.


Maybe you create new recipes and dishes for dinner each night.


Perhaps you create content on social media.


You have the ability to create a day according to your thoughts and ideas -- whether those be thoughts of abundance or scarcity.


You are a creator.


And allowing your creative power to flow can bring you more fulfillment, as well as provide a sense of true meaning -- meaning that is stronger and healthier than those provided by physical stuff or identity-driven tribes.


For a long time, I had imposter syndrome because my father (who was my hero) created really cool physical stuff like airliners and spacecraft.


It took me way too long to realize that I didn't have to make that kind of stuff to be a creator.


And realizing my creative power was key to realizing my power as an individual, which was a milestone in my realizing my inherent worth and gaining a sense of freedom and fulfillment.


What will you create today? How will you create today? For whom will you create today?


Let that creativity flow.


*****


P.S. Can't say enough great things about Dr. Lyons at Lyonspine Chiropractic here in Ellijay, GA.



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